Been wondering for a long time, but when did Becky get into video games?

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This topic contains 28 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Urban Banner UrbanBanner 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #137600

    Not talking about the live show, talking about her child or teenage years.
    She called Zelda1 NES the best and got excited about it.
    How does a female get into these types of games back in the days?
    By these type, I know females played cuter games, but don’t know how many played hard games.

    Now a days, it’s more accepted, but back then, female gamers were rarer unless if it was more of a cute game.

    —————————-
    edit:

    You have internet now a days, girl gamers are well known now. Back then, not that known, and video games weren’t even marketed to woman. Let’s just say, I grew up not knowing girl gamers, never seeing them in the arcades unless if they were hanging with a guy.
    You grow up thinking something, you end up thinking that way.

    Restricted = No
    It’s basically the same thing as a guy being a cheer leader(Sorry, very very sucky example). They can be it, I’m fine with guy cheeer leaders, but back in the days, this wasn’t known either to me.

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of KingOfHeart .
    • This topic was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of KingOfHeart .
Viewing 28 replies - 1 through 28 (of 28 total)
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  • #137602
    Profile photo of chrya
    chrya
    Moderator

    “How does a female get into these types of games back in the days?”
    I would think with a NES and a TV, that’s a stupid statement

    #137611
    Profile photo of TJgalon
    TJgalon
    Member

    I always played them with my younger sisters. I was super good, so games like Super Mario were bad. I could beat the whole game on a single life more or less, but then they started making them better. Like Mario 3, which forces each player a turn per level / death. Also games like Mario kart. Sometimes, they enjoy watching me play, which is cool. While I can’t speak for becky, she mention playing them since she was young too, so maybe a sibbling, or she just found them fun :).

    #137612
    Profile photo of aptharsia
    aptharsia
    Member

    I remember playing Atari, Commodore 64, NES to the PS and onward (I am a chick.) Think a lot of it had to do with I had an older brother so watching him play made me want to play, plus games are freaking cool who wouldn’t want to play?! Maybe Becky had a similar experience, watching someone else play and it caught on?

    #137616
    Profile photo of badthoughts
    badthoughts
    Member

    If you’re a kid in a household with a console you’ll wind up playing the console and probably have fun because videogames are fun, especially if it’s Legend of Zelda, it’s the best darn game on the NES. Hence, you are into games, regardless of your gender.

    #137627
    Profile photo of SkittleE
    SkittleE
    Member

    My mom’s a decade and a bit older than Becky, I think, and she got the NES when she was a teenager. She loved the original Zelda, absolutely adored it. She’s really good at 2D Zelda games now because of it (although maybe not as much 3D Zelda games, as I had to teach her how to open doors when she got to Dodongo’s Cavern in OoT). Thought I’d bring that up, since it’s a bit of a similar situation to Becky’s, I think.

    #137635

    I remember Becky having a sister, but brothers… I can’t remember this.
    A brother would make the most logic answer on how she would get into it.

    #137639
    Profile photo of verykirsten
    verykirsten
    Member

    Is it really unthinkable that the Blow household would have a game system of some kind, or that Becky would start playing games on her own? Just because you hadn’t heard of female gamers back then doesn’t mean they weren’t a thing.

    #137652
    Profile photo of Drifter
    drifter
    Member

    How does a female get into these types of games back in the days?

    No different then from us guys I’m sure. I’m the only guy in a family with two sisters and my older sister received a Super Nintendo for her birthday. She encouraged me to play together with her even though I was hesitant towards video games at first and to this day my younger sister is a waaaay bigger gamer than I am, owning more games then I will probably ever own.

    #137657
    Profile photo of merme
    merme
    Member

    Her family likely had a console and she played it? Being a girl doesn’t mean you can only do things associated with females :/

    I had a NES when it came out, then most consoles after and I’m a girl. And no, I didn’t have a brother or male cousin that got me in to gaming. My mom (a female) bought them for me cause she’d thought I’d like it.

    #137660
    Profile photo of Royal Zoo
    JT-Lionheart
    Member

    It all depends on how you grow up really. I mean girls don’t have a certain way of liking things in their genes. The same way us dudes got into video games, we were young and we had something to play video games with at a very young age where it takes over your enjoyment for entertainment. More importantly it’s a hobby, hobbies are something we like to do on our own time whether it is to pass time or have fun. Something we like to or fell like doing on our own time. At a young age, hobbies such as video games are likely to consume hours and hours of time from a kid thus causing them to grow and get smarter with each game and get involved with the times as innovation began to change the gaming industry to blow people’s mind…. that’s enough for me, but you get the point.

    #137665

    I don’t really get why you think women can’t get into video games. They play because they want, and they play because they can. End of story.

    EDIT:

    Now a days, it’s more accepted, but back then, female gamers were rarer unless if it was more of a cute game.

    Ok, I don’t know if we grew up with different lifestyles, but I had 3 sisters and 1 brother growing up, and all of them were freaking addicted to Mega Man 2, which in fact, isn’t a cute game. Are you trying to say that back then, when it came to video games, girls were sort of restricted on what they were allowed to play?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Giga Steel Byter .
    #137678

    You have internet now a days, girl gamers are well known now. Back then, not that known, and video games weren’t even marketed to woman. Let’s just say, I grew up not knowing girl gamers, never seeing them in the arcades unless if they were hanging with a guy.
    You grow up thinking something, you end up thinking that way.

    Restricted = No
    It’s basically the same thing as a guy being a cheer leader(Sorry, very very sucky example). They can be it, I’m fine with guy cheeer leaders, but back in the days, this wasn’t known either to me.

    #137679
    Profile photo of Gingy
    Gingy
    Member

    Cheerleaders may not be a great example.

    For one thing, they exist solely to be eye candy for the bored audience. Guys don’t make the greatest eye-candies most of the time. Especially when outfits they wear are rather boring compared to what the girls wear.

    #137682

    So because video games weren’t marketed to women back then, that means you thought that girls weren’t exactly the gamer type? Ok, fair enough, but I grew up with a bunch of girl gamers in the household. Hell, one of my sisters now works for Naughty Dog. I guess it all ends up with how you grew up.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Giga Steel Byter .
    #137685

    Society and people in general do seem to have a pretty nasty habit of placing certain pointless walls between things, and considering how the mass populous floats more in a train of emotional thought, those stacks of emotional layers can begin to get quite muddled and obscured when the flood of media and society’s common norm is considered. Causing those in the pool of emotional thought to get further separated from most forms of certain logic and reasoning.

    #137693
    Profile photo of badthoughts
    badthoughts
    Member

    You grow up thinking something, you end up thinking that way.

    Well not really, your opinions and thoughts change based on what you learn and experience through your life. For the first few years of your life you grow up thinking Santa Claus is real, doesn’t mean you adamantly continue to think that when you find out he isn’t. You’ve been given numerous examples girls who had consoles back in those days in this very thread, I can give you more if you like, at least 4 girls (around ages 6-11) I knew in school had their own consoles and that was pre-internet being a big thing. I get why you thought that back then but now it’s already been proven to be wrong really.

    #137694
    Profile photo of euske
    euske
    Member

    This thread reminds me of this cartoon:
    http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=1883#comic

    #137702
    Profile photo of Evanatt
    Evanatt
    Member

    Personally back then I didn’t even feel “girl gamer” was a thing even. By that I mean most kids in all genders were gaming basically XD.

    Heck when I started playing games I played together with other females. I actually didn’t knew any dudes as friends back then. That came some years later when I moved and started on another school where I pretty much was the only girl in class (age 11-12), and none never treat me different because of my gender. I feel this whole gender gaming topic is recent, but that’s me.

    However, Some girls often seemed to stop gaming when they “grow up”, and felt they was too “old” to game (playing) or something?, And that they have to hurry to grow up and such. I’m kinda one of those who kept playing into my adulthood.

    -Oh and the cheerleader example is indeed maybe not the best (and very american, it’s not a common thing here at least generally). Maybe compare it to art, I remember in high school some other people had the thoughts that a guy taking art classes was normally gay, because they thought taking art class was a female thing, which I personally think was silly thing to think. Even though there were indeed very few dudes taking up art class (typically 1 among against 30 females we’re talking about here).
    Art is such a common thing, even though we didn’t see many dudes taking this creative aim in schools, doesn’t mean guys doesn’t draw and do art.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Evanatt Evanatt.
    #137706
    Profile photo of dksigne
    dksigne
    Member

    Personally I grew up without a console, but with a PC and friends with consoles. I played the hell out of Commander Keen, Jazz Jackrabbit, Duke Nukem and Leisure Suit Larry. My mother was a huge Diablo player back then, but never let me play, I was always on her lap during these epic times. I don’t think you can say it’s unusual for a girl to play video games, not even back then. Less so I’d say. There was less focus on gender stereotypes, which made my wishes for action figures way more normal then know. No one ever questioned it when I was a kid, and I don’t remember being left out by the others for playing video games and playing outside in the mud. So how Becky got into video games, probably the same way you did, by seeing a cool commercial, mentioning it to a parent and getting that console as a present :)

    #137725

    I don’t think you can say it’s unusual for a girl to play video games, not even back then. Less so I’d say. There was less focus on gender stereotypes

    I have been noticing the same thing, in broader North American culture, so it is good to know it isn’t just me.

    When I was very young (I am 33 now, so very young is the 80s), I was aware of the way that toys were marketed based on “child gender identity stereotypes” but that seemed to disappear when I was a teenager in the 90s. It didn’t really seem like gender mattered: everyone I hung out with had similar interests, dressed in similar ways (skaters and hippies, basically), and spoke in similar ways, whether they be male or female.

    I didn’t actually notice this “new segregation” until a few years ago, either. It is disheartening to see that we are “going backward” to an era where you aren’t an individual but just a member of some group (determined by someone else, not by you).

    I am all for studying these stereotypes, understanding where they originated, and finding ways to unravel them so that people aren’t so limited. People are people and I think that the content of this thread demonstrates that: interests exist in spite of stereotypes and prejudice, not because of them.

    #137727
    Profile photo of TJgalon
    TJgalon
    Member

    Thinking back, My mom and grandma played video game too. My Grandma love Bubble bobble, and even play some games, though she liked to at night, afraid I would make fun of her losing, and my mom love arcade games like pac man, and played Zelda and other games.I remember being asked for help, for some hard stuff, lol.

    #137739
    Profile photo of SkittleE
    SkittleE
    Member

    Apparently during the day when everyone was at school, and after she sent everyone to bed, my grandma would play Super Mario Bros. From what I heard, she got really good at it. That was really funny for me to learn, since my grandma doesn’t seem at all like the type to get so into a game. XD

    #137751
    Profile photo of Megiddo
    Megiddo
    Member

    This topic is so awkward on so many levels

    #137794
    Profile photo of tgorman83
    tgorman83
    Member

    I would assume she got into video games the same way I and many other people got into video games. By seeing a game that catches there interest and playing said game at the earliest opportunity. Or grow up with friends and family who have video games. What exactly does being a girl have to do with it?

    #137833

    redacted

    #137835
    Profile photo of missblow
    missblow
    Member

    I’ve always been into video games. I have three older sisters (3, 9 and 12 years older). They’re pretty awesome and asked our parents to buy us systems. So I grew up with the Atari (which we had to play in the basement under the stairs!) and we moved on to the NES when it came out. I’d say I grew up more with the NES than the Atari, but I did play both.
    My parents love new gadgets, especially when they are educational. So they also bought us things like Texas Instrument Little Professors Calculator and Tiger Electronic handheld systems in the 1980s. Then we got a Gameboy when those game out. Everyone in my family now has at least a DS thanks to my mom and dad!
    We also had a rocking’ arcade in the mall one town over. So my cousin and I would spend time there whenever we could. She had an SNES and I had a Sega Genesis, so we kinda got the best of both worlds for that generation!
    I stopped gaming as much in high school and university/college. But got back into it in, like, 2004. And haven’t looked back since!

    As for the gender part of this discussion, when I was little, I was playing whatever my sisters were. And they were playing whatever looked cool! My family really doesn’t subscribe to gender roles. For example, three of my four nieces play hockey, only one of my four nephews plays hockey. One of my nephews dances, none of my nieces dance.

    So there’s ma gaming history in a nutshell!

    #137852

    Thx for replying.
    Your family is so cool!

    #137883
    Profile photo of Urban Banner
    UrbanBanner
    Member

    I knew someone else had to have that calculator thing also! Sweet!

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3405/3409011655_28caf3ec76.jpg

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